This is a round-up of the most popular finance links from Tip'd, the social media site for finance, in the past week. This week's stories includes a power guide to scoring free grub, an ode to the joy of local banking, and a blast from the past (depression).

Suze Orman Vs. Dave Ramsey: Should Your Financial Guru Be Changing His/Her Advice? (24 Tips)
Is it more desirable to follow a system that is immune to the ups and downs of the economy or a system which embraces changing based on new information and circumstances? Read what other PF nerds have to say.

25 Ways to Eat For Free (Really): Get Free Food! (23 Tips)
25 ways you can get free food. Click the above link if you're hungry and broke, or check out what people are saying about it.

Forget Stress Tests: Consider Local Banking (23 Tips)
Government stress tests are basically useless for regular folks. Instead, look at your local banks and evaluate how well that institution is holding up. Hint: Local banks and credit unions are probably in better shape than the big guys. Read what people are saying about it.

16 Depression Era Money Saving Tips (20 Tips)
Rather than passively absorbing fear and uncertainty, we would do well to remember that some people managed to stay afloat during the Great Depression - and to learn how they did it. In that vein, here are 16 Depression-era money saving tips. Read what people are saying about it.

The Best 529 Plans - 2009 Edition (20 Tips)
Interested in saving for college? Yes? Then check out this list of the best 529 plans.Read what other people think of 529s.

You can get more of today's hot finance stories at tipd.com. At Tip'd, the community chooses which financial stories go "hot" and appear on the homepage. The links above are those links which got "tipped" the most in the past seven days by the community members.


Increase your money and finance knowledge from home

Banking Services 101

Understand your bank's services, and how to get the most from them

View Course »

Introduction to Preferred Shares

Learn the difference between preferred and common shares.

View Course »

Add a Comment

*0 / 3000 Character Maximum