Circuit City liquidators selling shattered TVs, other junk, at high prices

WalletPop readers already know that the Circuit City liquidation sales are to a good deal as pigs are to flying, but the last week has shown that Circuit City shoppers face a bigger threat than paying too much -- the threat of broken merchandise.

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    A worker of troubled shoe factory Aida eats her snack as she joins other protesters in blockading the main road in the northern Bosnian town of Tuzla February 25, 2009. Workers and other vulnerable categories are launching protests across Bosnia requesting government support for ailing companies as the global recession is threatening the economy of the war torn Balkan country. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA)

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As the retailer enters its death throes, it has been smashing up merchandise and selling it "as-is" to unsuspecting customers. To add insult to injury, the broken merchandise can't be returned to Circuit City or be fixed under warranty by the manufacturer!

The Boston Channel Reports that at least one shopper ended up with a completely shattered HDTV after returning home from a bargain hunting expedition to Circuit City. Repairs for the $1,100 Samsung LCD, which neither Circuit City nor Samsung would cover, cost the couple more than $2,000, leaving them rightfully peeved!The Consumerist found that this wasn't an isolated incident, with a similar tale coming out of the Minnesota, where another shattered HDTV, this time a Panasonic, was purchased. When the local TV station visited the store to help negotiate a replacement they were asked to leave and referred to corporate.

High priced TVs aren't the only defective items being sold at Circuit City; even tightly packaged video games are vulnerable to the liquidation blues. Kotaku reports that Circuit City sold one gamer a Playstation 2 game which looks like it was used as a nametag for someone named Danny and then fed to a paper shredder. (with pictures)

The liquidators handling Circuit City's sales clearly state that all sales are final and urge customers to check merchandise before purchase, but they also prohibit customers from opening any packaging to do a thorough inspection, which is why these people are getting ripped off. The only realistic option for getting any money back would be to do a chargeback with the credit card company.

Even if you manage to score a working HDTV, you'll more than likely pay too much, even this late in the liquidation process. When Don Reisinger of CNet's Crave blog went looking for a new TV at Circuit City, he found that the liquidation price was still $200 more than Amazon's. When Circuit City refused to match the price, he went across the street and got the Amazon price at his local Best Buy.

Do yourself a favor and give Circuit City and its death gurgle a big miss. Between the broken merchandise and higher prices, you're better off shopping online or going to a local store that will be around longer than Easter. If you have a horror story from the Circuit City liquidation, let us know in the comments below.

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