"Sunday dinner" was a regular thing for my siblings and I when my parents lived in town; and a great way for the family with the mostest to play hostess to those of us with less fabulously-well paying jobs. My sisters are all working in industries celebrated far more for their contribution to society than for their paychecks (two private school teachers, one missionary). My brother and I each have three very young children. Eating at my parents' house was the one way we could guarantee a healthy meal in good comopany without having to anxiously gauge the pennies left in our bank account at every glass of milk. Sadly, my parents moved 50 miles away from the city a few years ago, making the Sunday dinner a little more costly and reducing the frequency to bi-monthly.

I have to admit occasionally feeling a little jealous of my youngest sister, who's still single, and can take advantage of an even more entertaining way to save money: going on dates. I vicariously live through her and my other friends who are single, suggesting great restaurants in which to meet new men or to visit on special occasions. *I* could only afford these restaurants once or twice a year, but I eagerly send them out to take financial advantage of men in search of love.

I do not know if my parents told my single sister this, but they were a little mournful when she broke up with her most recent boyfriend. "I have to say, I was happy to see that one of my children had a chance at marrying someone who's financially stable!" mom said. It's not in the cards. At the very least we can advise Abby to find a lovely man whose parents cook up a mean Sunday dinner... it's a great way to save cash if she, too, marries for nothing but love.


Increase your money and finance knowledge from home

Intro to Retirement

Get started early planning for your long term future.

View Course »

How much house can I afford

Home buying 101, evaluating one of your most important financial decisions.

View Course »

Add a Comment

*0 / 3000 Character Maximum