- Days left
Just about everyone is looking for a little extra cash right now, and here's one way that might help. Search for money that belongs to you, but is being held by the government. A site called Missing Money can help you do exactly that, and it's easy and free.

State laws required companies and governments that have money belonging to you to turn it over if you can't be found. You might have forgotten about a bank account you had, and you may have long moved away from the address the bank had on file for you. You may have a balance in a retirement fund from a job you had 15 years ago, and they've lost track of you. There may be a tax refund that you never received because your check was returned to the Internal Revenue Service as undeliverable by the post office.

States collect these fund and attach your name to them, in case you ever decide to claim the money. Missing Money has tapped into the databases maintained by most states to offer you an easy way to search for your own name. If you find funds that belong to you, the site will help you submit your information to the appropriate agency to collect your money. How much easier could it be?

I can't vouch for the accuracy of the information on the site, or whether people have used it successfully, but it seems worth a try. After all you have nothing to lose... only money to find!

Tracy L. Coenen, CPA, MBA, CFE performs fraud examinations and financial investigations for her company Sequence Inc. Forensic Accounting, and is the author of Essentials of Corporate Fraud.

Increase your money and finance knowledge from home

Economics 101

Intro to economics. But fun.

View Course »

Introduction to Preferred Shares

Learn the difference between preferred and common shares.

View Course »

TurboTax Articles

Tax Tips for the Blind

Anyone whose field of vision falls at or below 20 degrees, who wears corrective glasses but whose vision is 20/200 or less in his best eye, or who has no eyesight at all, meets the legal definition of being blind and is eligible for certain tax deductions.

What is Form 4255: Recapture of Investment Credit?

When is a tax credit not a tax credit? When the IRS takes it back. If you're in the situation where you have to file IRS Form 4255, you might have to pay back a tax credit you've earned in prior years. This process, known as recapture, occurs if you claim a credit -- in this case, a credit for a specific type of business investment -- and then no longer qualify for that credit.

The Most Important Tax Forms for ALEs (Applicable Large Employers)

In 2015, some parts of the Affordable Care Act specifically apply to businesses, in particular, large employers. The Employer Shared Responsibility provisions affect companies with 50 or more full-time employees or an equivalent of part-time or seasonal workers. These companies are called Applicable Large Employers, or ALEs. 2015 is considered a transition year as everyone gets used to the new normal for workplace health plans.

Employer Sponsored Health Coverage Explained

The Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, is simpler than some people may give it credit for. The basic rule to remember is that everyone must carry Minimum Essential Coverage (MEC) or pay a penalty. Employers with 50 full-time employees or more are obligated to sponsor plans for their workers to help them meet this requirement.

How to Report RSUs or Stock Grants on Your Tax Return

Restricted stock units (RSUs) and stock grants are often used by companies to reward their employees with an investment in the company rather than with cash. As the name implies, RSUs have rules as to when they can be sold. Stock grants often carry restrictions as well. How your stock grant is delivered to you, and whether or not it is vested, are the key factors when determining tax treatment.

Add a Comment

*0 / 3000 Character Maximum