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All those who filed extensions for their 2007 tax returns, both business and personal, are probably starting to panic about now. They filed the extensions, and now they're trying to remember when the tax returns are actually due. It was much easier to put off filing even longer once the extension was sent in.

Here's a rundown of the dates you'll need to keep in mind:
  • Personal taxes (Form 1040) -- If you filed an extension, you've got until October 15 to file your return. Don't wait any longer than that. If you're eligible for an economic stimulus check, you can only get it if you meet the October 15 deadline. You won't get a check if you file after October 15.
  • Sole Proprietorship (Schedule C) -- If you file your business taxes as a sole proprietorship, you'll be filing a schedule C with your Form 1040, and therefore will also be subject to the October 15 deadline.
  • Partnerships and LLCs (Form 1065) -- You have until October 15 to file if you sent in an extension.
  • Corporations (Form 1120) - You have until September 15 to file if you sent in an extension.
This page provides a handy calendar regarding due dates for tax returns and estimated tax payments. Don't forget that filing an extension did not give you an extension on time to pay your taxes. All taxes due on income earned in 2007 should have been paid by January 15, 2008. If you still owe money, you will be assessed interest and penalties on any amount that was paid late.

Tracy L. Coenen, CPA, MBA, CFE performs fraud examinations and financial investigations for her company Sequence Inc. Forensic Accounting, and is the author of Essentials of Corporate Fraud.

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