Layoffs and cutbacks at work are a reality for everyone lately. Gone are the days when you would work 30 or 40 years for one company and then retire. Neither companies nor employees have the same loyalty that they used to. (And I'm not complaining about it. I say that this has created a lot of opportunities for good employees to try new things and move up if they're capable.)

Human resource managers offer up some fairly common sense tips for being more likely to keep your job when layoffs creep up at your company:

  • Don't be the loner who doesn't get along well with others
  • Don't come in late or shirk your responsibilities
  • Make sure that you're really earning your paycheck, especially if you're one of the higher-paid people
  • If you're in a leadership role, make sure you've developed good relationships with your colleagues and subordinates
  • Make sure your boss knows what you're accomplishing and that you're adding value

I don't think any of these are shockers for most people Companies are looking for the most value from their employees, as well as those who are most flexible and can work with many different people. Job cuts aren't always fair, but following these tips can definitely increase your chances of keeping your job.

And if you're a valuable employee and you still get laid off? Consider this your opportunity to find an even better position that highlights your skills and abilities.

Tracy L. Coenen, CPA, MBA, CFE performs fraud examinations and financial investigations for her company Sequence Inc. Forensic Accounting, and is the author of Essentials of Corporate Fraud.

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