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With millions of people scrambling to get their taxes in on time, there's a large group facing additional complications and the possibility of additional taxes: the estimated 3 million same-sex couples living together as households.

USA Today takes a great look at this overlooked issue: "Take two couples where one partner has a taxable income of $20,000 and the other makes $40,000. If they can file their federal taxes jointly, the tax bill would be $8,217.50. Filing separately, the combined bill would be $9,032.50 - more than $800 higher."

The federal government does not recognize same-sex marriages even from legally-married Massachusetts couples, which can lead to another complication: filing state taxes jointly but federal taxes individually.

Britney and K-Fed could file taxes jointly and save money, but a gay couple that's lived together for 30 years and adopted children can't. That's wrong, and it's also stupid.

Some good links: the best argument for gay marriage comes from a Republican state congressman from Wyoming. If you haven't seen it before, here are 12 (very sarcastic) reasons that gay marriage will ruin America.

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