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You may still be able to make a contribution to a Roth IRA for 2007. In order to be eligible to make a Roth IRA contribution, you must have taxable compensation like wages, but your compensation must not exceed certain limits (modified adjusted gross income of $169,000 for married couples and $116,000 for single).

You can contribute up to $4,000, or if you're age 50 or older, up to $5,000. The maximum amount you can contribute will be influenced by your income. Spouses can contribute to Roth IRAs even if they didn't have income, so long as one spouse had sufficient wages.

A Roth IRA contribution can be made anytime during the year. If you didn't contribute to one in 2007, you still have time to make a contribution that will count for 2007, though. You have until April 15, 2008 to contribute for 2007.

Complete details on IRA contributions and distributions are found in IRS Publication 590.

Tracy L. Coenen, CPA, MBA, CFE performs fraud examinations and financial investigations for her company Sequence Inc. Forensic Accounting, and is the author of Essentials of Corporate Fraud.

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