- Days left

There's still time to create deductible expenses for 2007

Put away the noisemakers! It isn't the new year yet. And you're probably searching around the net thinking, how can I decrease my tax burden before the year expires?

If you're on the West Coast like me, you may still have time to use up your health care flexible spending account by going to an enterprising optometrist, dentist, or chiropracter. If you've spent more than (or very, very close to) 7.5% of your gross income in health care expenses this year -- which is a LOT of health care expenses, by the way -- you might want to pay a couple more bills to take advantage of those expenditures.

The easiest way to create deductions in the last few hours of the year is, of course, charity. Give until you can't give any more, and most charitable institutions allow you to use your credit or debit cards to pay online, and it will count for 2007, right up until midnight. If you must send money to your church, community food bank, or other small non-credit-accepting institution, run! Bike! Drive! (careful! It's a party night!) to the nearest post office that postmarks until midnight, and stick a check in the mail.

Finally, if you're self-employed or have a small business whose expenses you write off on your taxes, and you use the cash method of accounting, now is the time to pile on those profit-reducing costs! I make a small income photographing knitting and designing knitting patterns, so I have been struck with the unavoidable compunction to go buy yarn for my next creation. If you don't have any shops nearby open, turn again to the web. Do you need books? Amazon.com's still open. Paper? Ink for your printer? You get the idea.

Note that small incomes like mine are only considered self-employment if you make a profit in one out of every three years. Otherwise, it's a non-deductible hobby.

Increase your money and finance knowledge from home

Managing your Portfolio

Keeping your portfolio and financial life fit!

View Course »

Timing Your Spending

How to pay less by changing when you purchase.

View Course »

TurboTax Articles

Cities with the Lowest Tax Rates

The total amount of tax you pay reaches far beyond what you owe the federal government. Depending on where you live, most likely you're required to pay additional taxes, including property and sales tax. The disparity between the amount of tax you pay in a low-tax city and that in a high-tax city can be dramatic. Living in any of these 10 cities could save you a bundle, although the exact amount may fluctuate based on your income and lifestyle choices.

Cities with the Highest Tax Rates

Much ado is made in the press about federal tax brackets, but cities can carry a tax bite of their own. Even if you live in a state that has no income tax, your city may levy a variety of taxes that could eat away the entire benefit of living in an income tax-free state, including property taxes, sales taxes and auto taxes. Consider all the costs before you move to one of these cities, and understand that rates may change based on your family's income level.

Great Ways to Get Charitable Tax Deductions

Generally, when you give money to a charity, you can use the amount of that donation as a deduction on your tax return. However, not all charities qualify as tax-deductible organizations. While there are many types of charities, they must all meet certain criteria to be classified by the IRS as tax-deductible organizations. There are legitimate tax-deductible organizations in many popular categories, such as those listed below.

A Freelancer's Guide to Taxes

Freelancing certainly has its benefits, but it can result in a few complications come tax time. The Internal Revenue Service considers freelancers to be self-employed, so if you earn income as a freelancer you must file your taxes as a business owner. While you can take additional deductions if you are self-employed, you'll also face additional taxes in the form of the self-employment tax. Here are things to consider as a freelancer when filing your taxes.

Tax Deductions for Voluntary Interest Payments on Student Loans

Most taxpayers who pay interest on student loans can take a tax deduction for the expense ? and you can do this regardless of whether you itemize tax deductions on your return. The rules for claiming the deduction are the same whether the interest payments were required or voluntary.

Add a Comment

*0 / 3000 Character Maximum